fee simple
fee sim·ple n pl fees simple [simple without limitation (as to heirs) and unrestricted (as to transfer of ownership)]: a fee that is alienable (as by deed, will, or intestacy) and of potentially indefinite duration; esp: fee simple absolute in this entry
fee simple absolute: a fee that is freely inheritable and alienable without any limitations or restrictions on transfers and that is of indefinite duration
◇ A fee simple absolute is conveyed by language granting the estate “to the grantee and his or her heirs,” “to the grantee, his heirs and assigns,” or “to the grantee.” The term heirs is considered in this context a word of limitation, and so this does not create a future interest in the estate in the heirs but simply makes the estate freely alienable.
fee simple conditional: a fee granted to an individual and to that individual's descendants which is subject to a reversion or remainder if the grantee has no lineal descendants but which becomes a fee simple absolute and freely alienable upon the birth of a direct descendant see also de donis conditionalibus in the important laws section compare fee tail at fee
◇ The fee simple conditional is not recognized in England or the United States except in South Carolina.
fee simple determinable: a defeasible fee that automatically terminates upon the occurrence of a specified event or condition and which reverts to the grantor compare estate on condition at estate
◇ A fee simple determinable is conveyed by language which states that the estate automatically terminates and reverts to the grantor, and which expresses duration (“so long as,” “until,” “during the time that”).
fee simple on condition sub·se·quent /-'səb-si-kwənt/: a defeasible fee that may be terminated by the grantor or assigns upon the occurrence of an event – called also fee simple subject to condition subsequent;
◇ A fee simple on condition subsequent is conveyed by language that creates a right of entry or power of termination in the grantor and that expresses condition (“on condition that,” “provided that”).
in fee simple: under title that creates a fee simple (as a fee simple absolute)
entitled him to ownership of the disputed property in fee simpleNational Law Journal

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

fee simple
index freehold

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


fee simple
n.
Complete ownership of a property, with no time limit or restrictions on what can be done with it, that will pass to the owner’s heirs if he or she dies intestate; also called fee simple absolute.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


fee simple
An old term meaning complete ownership of real estate. Owners with fee simple have no legal restrictions on their freedom sell the property, give it away, or leave it at death. it is sometimes used in real estate deeds, as in "Harry Hernandez grants to Roberta Irving title in fee simple . . ." Compare: fee tail
Category: Real Estate & Rental Property → Buying a House
Category: Real Estate & Rental Property → Selling a House

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.

fee simple
Fee simple absolute in possession. A freehold interest in land.

Practical Law Dictionary. Glossary of UK, US and international legal terms. . 2010.


fee simple
n. At common law, the broadest possible ownership interest in real estate, inheritable by any heir of the owner.
@ fee simple absolute
A fee simple with no conditions placed upon it and that will endure as long as there are descendants of the original owner to inherit it.
@ fee simple defeasible
A fee simple that is terminable despite the existence of heirs, because of the occurrence of a particular event or condition.
@ fee simple determinable
A fee simple that terminates and reverts to the grantor upon the occurrence of a particular event or condition; commonly a grant of property to be used for charitable purposes and that reverts if no longer used in this way.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


fee simple
The greatest possible estate in land, wherein the owner has the right to use it, exclusively possess it, commit waste upon it, dispose of it by deed or will, and take its fruits. A fee simple represents absolute ownership of land, and therefore the owner may do whatever he or she chooses with the land. If an owner of a fee simple dies intestate, the land will descend to the heirs.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


fee simple
The greatest possible estate in land, wherein the owner has the right to use it, exclusively possess it, commit waste upon it, dispose of it by deed or will, and take its fruits. A fee simple represents absolute ownership of land, and therefore the owner may do whatever he or she chooses with the land. If an owner of a fee simple dies intestate, the land will descend to the heirs.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

fee simple
n.
   absolute title to land, free of any other claims against the title, which one can sell or pass to another by will or inheritance. This is a redundant form of "fee," but is used to show the fee (absolute title) is not a "conditional fee," or "determinable fee," or "fee tail." Like "fee" it is often used in deeds transferring title, as in "Harry Hadit grants to Robert Gotit title in fee simple:" or similar words.
   See also: fee

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fee simple — is an estate in land in common law. It is the most common way real estate is owned in common law countries, and is ordinarily the most complete ownership interest that can be had in real property short of allodial title, which is often reserved… …   Wikipedia

  • Fee simple — Fee Fee (f[=e]), n. [OE. fe, feh, feoh, cattle, property, money, fief, AS. feoh cattle, property, money; the senses of property, money, arising from cattle being used in early times as a medium of exchange or payment, property chiefly consisting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fee simple — UK US noun [U] (also fee absolute) PROPERTY, LAW ► the right to own a building or piece of land without time limit: »The vendor was granted the fee simple of the property. → Compare LEASEHOLD(Cf. ↑leasehold) → …   Financial and business terms

  • fee simple — n. 〚Anglo Fr: see FEE & SIMPLE〛 absolute ownership of real property with unrestricted rights of disposition * * * …   Universalium

  • fee simple — Real property in which the owner is entitled to the entire property and subject to no conditions (SA Bankruptcy.com) Title to ownership without restriction or limitation. For example ownership of land in fee simple means the land is owned out… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • fee simple — n. [Anglo Fr: see FEE & SIMPLE] absolute ownership of real property with unrestricted rights of disposition …   English World dictionary

  • fee simple — Typically, words fee simple standing alone create an absolute estate in devisee and such words followed by a condition or special limitation create a defeasible fee. Babb v. Rand, Me., 345 A.2d 496, 498. === Absolute. A fee simple absolute is an… …   Black's law dictionary

  • fee simple — Typically, words fee simple standing alone create an absolute estate in devisee and such words followed by a condition or special limitation create a defeasible fee. Babb v. Rand, Me., 345 A.2d 496, 498. === Absolute. A fee simple absolute is an… …   Black's law dictionary

  • fee simple — Synonyms and related words: adverse possession, alodium, burgage, claim, colony, copyhold, de facto, de jure, dependency, derivative title, equitable estate, estate at sufferance, estate for life, estate for years, estate in expectancy, estate in …   Moby Thesaurus

  • fee-simple — feodum simplex, a simple or pure fee; fee simple Feodum talliatum, a fee tail. In old English law, a seigniory or jurisdiction. A fee, a perquisite or compensation for a service …   Black's law dictionary

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