hypothecate
hy·poth·e·cate /hi-'pä-thə-ˌkāt, hī-/ vt -cat·ed, -cat·ing [Medieval Latin hypothecare to pledge, from Late Latin hypotheca pledge, from Greek hypothēkē, from hypotithenai to put under, deposit as pledge]: to pledge as security without delivery of title or possession compare pawn
hy·poth·e·ca·tion /-ˌpä-thə-'kā-shən/ n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

hypothecate
index bond (secure a debt), guarantee, pawn, pledge (deposit), promise (vow)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


hypothecate
v.
To pledge money or property for a particular purpose, often as security for a debt.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


hypothecate
To pledge as security for a loan without giving up possession, as in the case of property the borrower pledges as collateral and keeps.
Category: Bankruptcy, Foreclosure & Debt → Debt & Collection Agencies

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


hypothecate
v. To grant a security interest in something as collateral for a debt.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


hypothecate
To pledge property as security or collateral for a debt. Generally, there is no physical transfer of the pledged property to the lender, nor is the lender given title to the property, though he or she has the right to sell the pledged property in the case of default.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


hypothecate
To pledge property as security or collateral for a debt. Generally, there is no physical transfer of the pledged property to the lender, nor is the lender given title to the property, though he or she has the right to sell the pledged property in the case of default.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

hypothecate
v.
   from Greek for "pledge," a generic term for using property to secure payment of a loan, which includes mortgages, pledges and putting up collateral, while the borrower retains possession.
   See also: secured transaction

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:
(as ship, freight, cargo, etc., without delivery),


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hypothecate — Hy*poth e*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hypothecated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hypothecating}.] [LL. hypothecatus, p. p. of hypothecare to pledge, fr. L. hypotheca pledge, security. See {Hypotheca}.] (Law) To subject, as property, to liability for a debt… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hypothecate — hypothecate, hypothesize The correct word for ‘to form a hypothesis’ is hypothesize, and it is used with or without an object or with a that clause: • Quick to learn, quick to grasp concepts and to hypothesize, they need the best minds to provide …   Modern English usage

  • hypothecate — [hī päth′i kāt΄, hipäth′i kāt΄] vt. hypothecated, hypothecating [< ML hypothecatus, pp. of hypothecare, to hypothecate < LL hypotheca: see HYPOTHEC] 1. to pledge (property) to another as security without transferring possession or title 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • hypothecate — To mortgage or pledge without delivery of title or possession. To place or leave an item of property in the custody of another. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012 …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • hypothecate — UK US /haɪˈpɒθəkeɪt/ verb [T] ► FINANCE, LAW to give money by law for a particular purpose: »hypothecated educational grants …   Financial and business terms

  • hypothecate — 1680s, from hypothecat , pp. stem of M.L. hypothecare, from L.L. hypotheca, from Gk. hypotheke “a deposit, pledge, mortgage,” from hypo “down” + tithenai “to put, place” (see THEME (Cf. theme)). Related: Hypothecation …   Etymology dictionary

  • hypothecate — See hypothecate, hypothetical …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • hypothecate — I hy•poth•e•cate [[t]haɪˈpɒθ ɪˌkeɪt[/t]] v. t. cat•ed, cat•ing bus to pledge to a creditor as security without delivering, as property • Etymology: 1675–85; < ML hypothēcātus, ptp. of hypothēcāre, v. der. ofhypothecapledge, mortgage < Gk… …   From formal English to slang

  • hypothecate — I. transitive verb ( cated; cating) Etymology: Medieval Latin hypothecare to pledge, from Late Latin hypotheca pledge, from Greek hypothēkē, from hypotithenai to put under, deposit as a pledge Date: 1681 to pledge as security without delivery of… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hypothecate — hypothecate1 hypothecation, n. hypothecator, n. /huy poth i kayt , hi /, v.t., hypothecated, hypothecating. 1. to pledge to a creditor as security without delivering over; mortgage. 2. to put in pledge by delivery, as stocks given as security for …   Universalium

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