promise
prom·ise n: a declaration or manifestation esp. in a contract of an intention to act or refrain from acting in a specified way that gives the party to whom it is made a right to expect its fulfillment
aleatory promise: a promise (as to compensate an insured individual for future loss) whose fulfillment is dependent on a fortuitous or uncertain event
collateral promise: a promise usu. to pay the debt of another that is ancillary to an original promise, is not made for the benefit of the party making it, and must be in writing to be enforceable
false promise: a promise that is made with no intention of carrying it out and esp. with intent to deceive or defraud
gratuitous promise: a promise that is made without consideration and is usu. unenforceable – called also naked promise; compare nudum pactum
◇ A gratuitous promise may be enforceable under promissory estoppel.
illusory promise: a purported promise that does not actually bind the party making it to a particular performance
an illusory promise depending solely on the will of the supposed promisor
implied promise: a promise that is considered to exist despite the lack of an agreement or express terms to that effect and the breach of which may be recognized as a cause of action
claimed a breach of an implied promise that he would not be terminated at will see also promise implied in fact and promise implied in law in this entry
naked promise: gratuitous promise in this entry
original promise: a promise (as in a suretyship) usu. to pay the debt of another that is made primarily for the benefit of the party making it and need not be in writing to be enforceable compare collateral promise in this entry main purpose rule
promise implied in fact: an implied promise that exists by inference from specific facts, circumstances, or acts of the parties
promise implied in law: an implied promise that exists on the basis of a legally enforceable duty and not on the basis of words or conduct which are promissory in form or support an inference of a promise
a promise implied in law that one will be compensated for services rendered and accepted

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

promise
I noun affirmation, agreement, asseveration, assurance, avowal, bond, commitment, compact, consent, contract, covenant, declaration, engagement, fides, guarantee, oath, obligation, pact, paction, pledge, promissum, stipulation, treaty, understanding, vadium, vow, warranty, word associated concepts: bilateral promises, consideration, contract, gift, unilateral promise foreign phrases:
- Ea quae, commendandi causa, in venditionibus dicuntur, si palam appareant, venditorem non obligant. — Those things which are said as praise of the things sold, if they are openly apparent do not bind the seller
- Nudum pactum est ubi nulla subest causa praeter conventionem; sed ubi subest causa, fit obligatio, et partt actionem. — A naked contract is where there is no consideration except the agreement, but where there is a consideration, an obligation is created and gives rise to a right of action
- Nuda pactio obligationem non park. — A naked agreement does not effect an otherwise binding obligation.
- Nuda ratio et nuda pactio non Hgant allquem debftorem. — Naked intention and naked promise do not bind any debtor
II (raise expectations) verb augur well, betoken, bid fair, cheer, embolden, encourage, enhearten, excite expectation, forebode, forecast, foreshadow, foreshow, foretell, forewarn, foster hope, give expectation, give hope, inspirit, lead one to expect, make a prediction, portend, predict, presage, prognosticate, prophesy, quicken, raise hopes, set astir, show signs of, signify, stimulate, suggest, threaten III (vow) verb accept a liability, accept an obligation, accept responsibility, adjure, affirm, affirm positively, agree, assert, assert an oath, assert positively, assert solemnly, assert under oath, asseverate, assure, attest, aver, avouch, avow, be answerable for, bear witness, become bound, bind, bind by a pledge, bind oneself, bind oneself by oath, certify, commit oneself, consent, contract, contract an obligation, covenant, declare, engage, engage in solemn manner, give assurance, give one's honor, give one's word, give one's word of honor, give security, guarantee, hypothecate, incur a duty, insure, make a solemn resolution, make an avowal, make an engagement, make an oath, make oneself answerable, obligate oneself, pledge, pledge one's credit, pledge one's honor, pledge one's word, pledge oneself, plight, plight one's honor, plight one's word, polliceri, stake one's credit, stipulate, swear, swear an oath, take a vow, take an oath, take upon oneself, testify, undertake, underwrite, vouch, vow, warrant associated concepts: breach of promise, nude promise, promise to answer for the debt of another, promise to pay IV index agree (contract), allegiance, assurance, assure (insure), bestow, bind (obligate), bond, bond (secure a debt), commitment (responsibility), compact, condition (contingent provision), contract (noun), contract (verb), cosign, covenant, coverage (insurance), depose (testify), duty (obligation), ensure, expectation, guarantee, insurance, oath, obligation (duty), pact, pledge (binding promise), possibility, potential, predict, presage, probability, proffer, prognosis, prognosticate, prospect (outlook), recognizance, responsibility (accountability), security (pledge), stipulate, stipulation, swear, testament, undertake, undertaking (pledge), underwrite, vouch, vow, warrant (guaranty), warranty

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


promise
n.
A binding declaration that a person will do a certain act, which gives the person receiving the promise the right to expect performance.
v.
To declare or assure someone that one will definitely do some act.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


promise
1) A firm commitment to perform an act, refrain from acting, or make a payment or delivery.
2) In contract law, something of value provided in return for the other party's promise (both of which are referred to as consideration). Failure to fulfill a contractual promise is a breach, for which the other party may seek legal remedies such as performance and damages.
Category: Business, LLCs & Corporations → Self-Employed Consultants & Contractors
Category: Representing Yourself in Court
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits
Category: Small Claims Court
Category: Working With a Lawyer

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


promise
n. An avowal to do something or to refrain from doing something, conveyed in such a way as to assure another that it will be done, and that can be considered binding.
@ gratuitous promise
A promise made without expectation of compensation; one not supported by consideration.
@ illusory promise
An agreement cloaked in terms that make it appear to be a promise, but not actually committing anything to anybody; for example, "I'll back you up as long as it's in my interest to do so." The person who made that promise is not obligated to do anything.
A promise to do something that is unenforceable or meaningless because the promisor has means of avoiding the commitment.
@

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


promise
A written or oral declaration given in exchange for something of value that binds the maker to do, or forbear from, a certain specific act and gives to the person to whom the declaration is made the right to expect and enforce performance or forbearance. An undertaking that something will or will not occur. It is a manifestation of intent to act, or refrain from acting, in a certain manner.
In the law of commercial paper, an undertaking to pay. It must be more than an acknowledgment of an obligation.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


promise
A written or oral declaration given in exchange for something of value that binds the maker to do, or forbear from, a certain specific act and gives to the person to whom the declara tion is made the right to expect and enforce performance or forbearance. An undertaking that something will or will not occur. It is a manifestation of intent to act, or refrain from acting, in a certain manner.
 
In the law of commercial paper, an undertaking to pay. It must be more than an acknowledgment of an obligation.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

promise
   1) n. a firm agreement to perform an act, refrain from acting or make a payment or delivery. In contract law, if the parties exchange promises, each promise is "consideration" (a valuable item) for the other promise. Failure to fulfill a promise in a contract is a breach of the contract, for which the other party may sue for performance and/or damages.
   2) v. to make a firm agreement to act, refrain from acting or make a payment or delivery.
   See also: consideration, contract, covenant

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Promise — Prom ise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Promised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Promising}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To engage to do, give, make, or to refrain from doing, giving, or making, or the like; to covenant; to engage; as, to promise a visit; to promise a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Promise — Prom ise, a. [F. promesse, L. promissum, fr. promittere, promissum, to put forth, foretell, promise; pro forward, for + mittere to send. See {Mission}. ] [1913 Webster] 1. In general, a declaration, written or verbal, made by one person to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • promise — vb Promise, engage, pledge, plight, covenant, contract are comparable when they mean to give one s word that one will act in a specified way (as by doing, making, giving, or accepting) in respect to something stipulated. Promise implies a giving… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • promise — [n1] one’s word that something will be done affiance, affirmation, agreement, asseveration, assurance, avowal, betrothal, bond, commitment, compact, consent, contract, covenant, earnest, engagement, espousal, guarantee, insurance, marriage, oath …   New thesaurus

  • promise — ► NOUN 1) an assurance that one will do something or that something will happen. 2) potential excellence. ► VERB 1) make a promise. 2) give good grounds for expecting. 3) (promise oneself) firmly intend …   English terms dictionary

  • promise — [präm′is] n. [ME promis < L promissum < promittere, to send before or forward < pro , forth + mittere, to send: see PRO 2 & MISSION] 1. an oral or written agreement to do or not to do something; vow 2. indication, as of a successful… …   English World dictionary

  • Promise — Prom ise, v. i. [1913 Webster] 1. To give assurance by a promise, or binding declaration. [1913 Webster] 2. To afford hopes or expectation; to give ground to expect good; rarely, to give reason to expect evil. [1913 Webster] Will not the ladies… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Promise — steht für: ein Album der englischen Gruppe Sade, siehe Promise (Album) ein Album des US Amerikaners Bruce Springsteen, siehe The Promise einen Fachbegriff aus der Informatik, siehe Future (Programmierung) Diese Seite ist …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • promise — (n.) c.1400, from L. promissum a promise, noun use of neuter pp. of promittere send forth, foretell, promise, from pro before (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + mittere to put, send (see MISSION (Cf. mission)). Ground sense is declaration made about the… …   Etymology dictionary

  • promise */*/*/ — I UK [ˈprɒmɪs] / US [ˈprɑmɪs] verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms promise : present tense I/you/we/they promise he/she/it promises present participle promising past tense promised past participle promised 1) to tell someone that you will… …   English dictionary

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