bill
bill n
1: a draft of a law presented to a legislature for enactment; also: the law itself
the GI bill
ap·pro·pri·a·tions bill /ə-ˌprō-prē-'ā-shənz-/: a bill providing money for government expenses and programs
◇ Appropriations bills originate in the House of Representatives.
bill of attainder
1: a legislative act formerly permitted that attainted a person and imposed a sentence of death without benefit of a judicial trial see also attainder compare bill of pains and penalties in this entry
2: a legislative act that imposes any punishment on a named or implied individual or group without a trial
◇ Bills of attainder are prohibited by Article I of the U.S. Constitution.
bill of pains and penalties: a legislative act formerly permitted that imposed a punishment less severe than death without benefit of a judicial trial compare bill of attainder in this entry
◇ The term bill of attainder is often used to include bills of pains and penalties. Bills of pains and penalties are included in the constitutional ban on bills of attainder.
clean bill: a bill in its form as amended and newly introduced to the legislature by a legislative committee
engrossed bill: a bill printed in the form in which it was passed by one chamber of Congress and certified by the appropriate legislative official
enrolled bill: a copy of a bill in the form in which it is passed in the legislature including all changes introduced before enactment that is kept as evidence of the law
House bill: a bill originating in the House of Representatives
money bill: revenue bill in this entry
om·ni·bus bill /'äm-ni-ˌbəs-/: a bill that includes a number of miscellaneous provisions or appropriations
private bill: a bill affecting a particular person, organization, or locality as distinguished from all the people or the whole area of a political unit
public bill: a bill affecting the community (as a nation or state) at large
revenue bill: a bill (as for imposing a tax) for raising money for any public purpose – called also money bill;
◇ The U.S. Constitution requires all bills for raising revenue to originate in the House of Representatives.
2: the pleading used to begin a suit in equity that sets forth the basis for one's claim against another – called also bill in equity;
3 a: a form or device of procedure used in civil actions
bill in the na·ture of a bill of review: an equitable bill seeking to have a court decree set aside that is brought by someone who was not a party to the original suit usu. before the decree is entered in the record compare bill of review in this entry
◇ Bills in the nature of a bill of review were abolished in federal practice by Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 60(b).
bill in the na·ture of interpleader: a bill of interpleader in which the plaintiff is allowed to claim an interest in the subject matter of the suit compare bill of interpleader in this entry interpleader
◇ In federal practice, bills in the nature of interpleader have been abandoned in favor of interpleader as described in Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 22.
bill of complaint: complaint
— used esp. in equity actions
bill of costs: a bill setting forth the expenses in connection with a suit that a party seeks to have paid by an opposing party
bill of exceptions: a bill setting forth the exceptions and objections to rulings made at trial and the evidence relevant to them for the purpose of appeal or other review
◇ Bills of exceptions are no longer required in federal practice under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, but they are still used in some state courts.
bill of interpleader: a bill brought by a plaintiff who seeks a court determination of the conflicting claims of two or more defendants to the subject matter of the suit (as money owed by the plaintiff) and who has no interest in the subject matter and no preference as to which defendant prevails – called also strict bill of interpleader; compare bill in the nature of interpleader in this entry interpleader
◇ Under most modern rules of procedure, the requirements for interpleader have been relaxed and the distinction between a bill of interpleader and a bill in the nature of interpleader no longer exists.
bill of par·tic·u·lars /-pər-'ti-kyə-lərz/: a bill containing a detailed listing and explanation of the claims made by the plaintiff
◇ Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12, bills of particulars have been abandoned in favor of the expanded rules for discovery and the motion for a more definite statement.
bill of peace: an equitable bill used to settle the rights of parties in one suit and avoid repeated litigation
bill of review: an equitable bill used to start a suit to have the final judgment of a previous suit set aside compare bill in the nature of a bill of review in this entry
◇ Bills of review are used when another device for review, such as appeal, is not available, as when the period to bring it has expired. Bills of review are abolished in federal practice by Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 60(b).
creditor's bill: an equitable bill by which a creditor who has won a court judgment against a debtor can compel payment from the debtor out of the property that is not otherwise reachable by legal process
cross bill: an equitable bill by which a party to a suit can bring a claim against any other party
◇ Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 13, cross bills are replaced by counterclaims and cross-claims.
strict bill of interpleader: bill of interpleader in this entry
b: a device or instrument used in criminal procedure
bill of indictment: an instrument that contains the charges against a defendant and that is presented to a grand jury for determination after a preliminary hearing whether there is enough evidence to issue an indictment – called also indictment; compare no bill and true bill in this entry
bill of information: information
bill of par·tic·u·lars /-pər-'ti-kyə-lərz/: a bill that a defendant may request in which the prosecution sets out in detail the facts forming the basis for the criminal charges against the defendant
no bill: a bill returned by a grand jury that has determined the evidence in a bill of indictment to be insufficient to warrant prosecution; also: the finding of the grand jury that the evidence is insufficient – called also ignoramus, no true bill;
true bill: a bill returned by a grand jury that has found the evidence in a bill of indictment sufficient to warrant prosecution: indictment
4: an itemized account of goods sold, services performed, or work done
5: a written instrument setting out the terms of a transaction involving goods: as
6: a piece of paper money
7: a written instrument providing proof of an obligation to pay money
bill of credit: an instrument written by a banker certifying to another that a person named in the instrument is entitled to draw on the banker's funds or credit up to a certain amount: letter of credit
bill of exchange: an instrument by one party directing another party to pay a named third party or anyone bearing it a specific amount of money on a named future date or on demand; also: draft
due bill: a bill given by a bank to the purchaser of a security in place of the security itself that entitles the purchaser to receive payment upon presentation
Treasury bill: a short-term obligation sold by the government at a discount that bears no interest but is payable at its face value at maturity compare treasury bond at bond 2 treasury note at note

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

bill
I (formal declaration) noun allegation of facts, claim, contractual obligation, customs documents, formal petition, indictment, itemized specification, legislative declaration, petition, promissory obligation, specification of details, statement of facts, written certificate, written complaint associated concepts: bill for discovery, bill for fraud, bill for new trial, bill in equity, bill in nature of interpleader, bill of attainder, bill of entry, bill of exceptions, bill of health, bill of indictment, bill of instructions, bill of interpleader, bill of particulars, bill of review, Bill of Rights, bill to quiet title, no true bill, true bill II (invoice) noun account, accounts payable, amount due, audit, balance due, charges, check, cost, deferred payment, demand for payment, expenditures, expenses, figure, itemized account, list, manifest, postponed payment, reckoning, record, report, request for payment, score, statement, statement of indebtedness, syngrapha, tally associated concepts: bank bill, bill book, bill for account, bill of costs, bill of credit, bill of exchange, bill of lading, bill of sale, bill payable, bill receivable, bond, creditor's bill III (proposed act) noun draft, legislation, measure, projected law, proposal, proposed enactment, proposed law, proposed regulation, proposed rule, proposed statute, protocol, resolution, rogatio associated concepts: act of legislature, law, omnibus bill, private bill, revenue bill IV index act (enactment), amendment (legislation), cash, charge (assess), check (instrument), codification, debt, draft, enactment, instrument (document), measure, receipt (voucher)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


bill
n.
(1) A statement of goods purchased or services rendered and moneys owed for them.
(2) A piece of paper currency.
(3) A draft of a proposed law introduced into the legislature for debate and voting.
(4) A pleading submitted by a plaintiff to an equity court stating grounds for a trial.
v.
To issue a statement requesting payment of moneys owed for goods or services.

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


Bill

Collins dictionary of law. . 2001.


bill
1) A statement of what is owed.
2) A legislative proposal for enactment of a law.
3) An old-fashioned term for various documents filed in lawsuits or criminal prosecutions.
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


bill
1 n. A draft of a proposed statute submitted to a legislature by one of its members for consideration and possible enactment.
@ appropriation bill
A bill that, if enacted, would authorize the expenditure of government funds.
@ engrossed bill
The draft of a bill as it is adopted by one house of a legislature and before it is sent to the other house for consideration.
See also enrolled bill.
@ enrolled bill
The final draft of a bill after it is adopted by both houses of a legislature, printed, checked for errors, and signed by the presiding officers of both houses before it is sent to the president or a governor for approval or rejection.
n. A final copy of legislation passed by the United States House of Representatives and the Senate, which is then sent to the president for signature.
See also engrossed bill.
@ omnibus bill
1 A bill that contains proposals on a variety of subjects. Usually, such a bill will have one major provision dealing with one topic and several minor provisions regarding matters unrelated to the major subject.
2 A bill that contains all proposals on a single (usually broad) subject, such as an omnibus education bill that includes all proposals regarding, however tangentially, the subject of education.
@ private bill
A bill concerning the interests, or affecting, only one or a small number of individuals, entities, or localities.
@ public bill
A bill concerning the general interests of, or affecting, the whole community, state, or country.
@ no true bill
@ no bill or no true bill
no bill or no true bill. The words used in a grand jury's notation on a bill of indictment indicating that insufficient evidence exists to support a criminal charge set forth in the proposed indictment. Such a decision by the grand jury prevents the prosecution from pursuing a criminal action against the defendant based on those charges until a new grand jury is selected.
@ revenue bill
A piece of legislation for the purpose of levying taxes. By the United States Constitution, all federal revenue bills must originate in the House of Representatives. A similar provision constraining the origin of revenue bills to one particular house of the state legislature is part of many of the various state constitutions.
=>> bill.
@ true bill
The words used in a grand jury's notation on a bill of indictment indicating that sufficient evidence exists to support a criminal charge set forth in the proposed indictment that, if proved, would result in the defendant's conviction. Once the bill of indictment is indorsed as a true bill and filed with the court, the prosecution must pursue a criminal action against the defendant based on those charges unless the court approves a dismissal.
@
2 n. A statement by one person or entity to another regarding money owed for goods sold and services performed. Usually the statement is in the form of an itemized list of the goods and services, along with the amount owed for each item.
3 v. To submit a request for payment for goods sold and services performed.
4 n. In equity law, the initial pleading wherein a party sets out their cause of action.
See also complaint, petition.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


bill
A declaration in writing. A document listing separate items. An itemized account of charges or costs. In equity practice, the first pleading in the action, the paper in which the plaintiff sets out his or her case and demands relief from the defendant.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


bill
A declaration in writing. A document listing separate items. An itemized account of charges or costs. In equity practice, the first pleading in the action, the paper in which the plaintiff sets out his or her case and demands relief from the defendant.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

bill
n.
   1) what is commonly called a "check" by which the signer requires the bank to pay a third party a sum of money. This is a holdover from the days when a person would draw up a "bill of exchange."
   2) a statement of what is owed.
   3) any paper money.
   4) a legislative proposal for enactment of a law. It is called a bill until it is passed and signed, at which time it is a law (statute) and is no longer referred to as a bill.
   5) an old-fashioned term for various filed documents in lawsuits or criminal prosecutions, which is falling into disuse.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • bill — bill …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Bill — Bill, n. [OE. bill, bille, fr. LL. billa (or OF. bille), for L. bulla anything rounded, LL., seal, stamp, letter, edict, roll; cf. F. bille a ball, prob. fr. Ger.; cf. MHG. bickel, D. bikkel, dice. Cf. {Bull} papal edict, {Billet} a paper.] [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bill — may refer to: Objects * Billboard (advertising), a board on which to display advertising posters or displays * Billhook, a long handled saw (sometimes weapon) with a curved blade * BILL Anti tank guided weapon, a Swedish anti tank weapon * BILL 2 …   Wikipedia

  • bill — [ bil ] n. m. • 1669; mot angl. ♦ Projet de loi du Parlement anglais. Rejeter un bill. Des bills. Par ext. La loi votée. ⊗ HOM. Bile. ● bill nom masculin (anglais bill, calque de l ancien français bulle, boule servant de sceau) En Grande Bretagne …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Bill — Bill, Max * * * (as used in expressions) Bill of Rights (Declaración de derechos) Bill, Max Blass, Bill Bradley, Bill Brandt, Bill Clinton, Bill Buffalo Bill Cosby, Bill …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • bill — Ⅰ. bill [1] ► NOUN 1) a printed or written statement of the money owed for goods or services. 2) a draft of a proposed law presented to parliament for discussion. 3) a programme of entertainment at a theatre or cinema. 4) N. Amer. a banknote. 5)… …   English terms dictionary

  • Bill — ist: Bill Allred Creek, ein Fluss im US Bundesstaat Utah Bill (Wyoming), Ort in den Vereinigten Staaten ein Filmtitel, siehe Bill (Film) ein Vorname, siehe Bill (Vorname) eine Bezeichnung für Nutzer von FON eine Panzerabwehrwaffe, siehe BILL Bill …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • bill —    ♦ bill broker, dealer in bills of exchange.    ♦ bill of adventure, declaration that merchandise shipped is not property of shipowner, whose liability is limited to safe delivery.    ♦ bill of costs, solicitor s account of charges.    ♦ bill… …   Dictionary of difficult words

  • Bill — Bill, n. [OE. bil, AS. bill, bil; akin to OS. bil sword, OHG. bill pickax, G. bille. Cf. {Bill} bea?.] 1. A cutting instrument, with hook shaped point, and fitted with a handle; used in pruning, etc.; a billhook. When short, called a hand bill,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bill — n Bill, beak, neb, nib denote the jaws of a bird together with their projecting horny covering. Bill is the general term and is used inclusively by ornithologists for such a structure; in popular usage, however, bill suggests a structure that is… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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