acquit
ac·quit /ə-'kwit/ vb ac·quit·ted, ac·quit·ting [Old French acquiter to pay off, absolve, acquit, from a-, prefix marking causation + quite free (of an obligation)]
vt: to discharge completely: as
a: to release from liability for a debt or other obligation
— usu. used in agreements
forever release, acquit, and discharge each other
b: to absolve (a criminal defendant) of a charge by judicial process
c: to clear of wrongdoing
the fact...does not acquit them of misrepresentationIn re Hiller, 694 P.2d 540 (1985)
vi: to absolve a defendant of criminal liability
must acquit if any reasonable doubt existedCommonwealth v. Gagliardi, 638 N.E.2d 20 (1994) compare convict

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

acquit
I verb absolve, absolvere, clear, compurgate, declare innocent, discharge, discharge from accusation, exculpate, excuse, exempt, exonerate, find not guilty, give a favorable verdict, grant remission, let off, liberare, liberate, make free, pardon, pronounce not guilty, prove innocent, purgare, release, remit, reprieve, set at liberty, set free, vindicate associated concepts: acquittal in fact, acquittal in law II index absolve, clear, comport (behave), demean (deport oneself), deport (conduct oneself), discharge (liberate), exculpate, excuse, exonerate, extenuate, forgive, free, liberate, palliate (excuse), pardon, pay, purge (wipe out by atonement), quit (free of), remit (release from penalty), remunerate, vindicate

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


acquit
v.
To set free or release; to absolve of criminal liability.
n.
acquittal

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


acquit
The finding by a judge or jury that a defendant is not guilty of a crime.
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


acquit
v.
1 In criminal law, to clear a person, to release or set him free, or to discharge him from an accusation of committing a criminal offense after a judicial finding that he is not guilty of the crime or after the court or prosecution determines that the case should not continue after the criminal trial has started.
2 In contract law, to pay or discharge a debt, duty, or a claim.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


acquit
To set free, release or discharge as from an obligation, burden or accusation. To absolve one from an obligation or a liability; or to legally certify the innocence of one charged with a crime.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


acquit
To set free, release or discharge as from an obligation, burden or accusation. To absolve one from an obligation or a liability; or to legally certify the innocence of one charged with a crime.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

acquit
v.
   what a jury or judge sitting without a jury does at the end of a criminal trial if the jury or judge finds the accused defendant not guilty.
   See also: verdict

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • acquit — [ aki ] n. m. • XIIe; de acquitter ♦ Reconnaissance écrite d un paiement. ⇒ décharge, quittance . Pour acquit : mention (avec date et signature) portée sur un document attestant un paiement. ♢ Loc. Par acquit de conscience : pour décharger… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • acquit — Acquit. s. m. v. Quitance. J en ay un bon acquit. je fourniray tous les acquits bons & valables. acquit patent. On dit, Payer une chose à l acquit d un autre, pour dire, La payer à la descharge d un autre. J ay payé cela à l acquit de la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Acquit — Ac*quit , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Acquitted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Acquitting}.] [OE. aquiten, OF. aquiter, F. acquitter; ? (L. ad) + OF. quiter, F. quitter, to quit. See {Quit}, and cf. {Acquiet}.] 1. To discharge, as a claim or debt; to clear off; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Acquit — (fr., spr. Akki), 1) Aussatz der Kugel beim Billard; 2) Empfangschein, Quittung überhaupt, besonders auf Wechseln (sd.). Acquit a comptant (spr. Akki a congtang), sonst seit Ludwig XV. in Frankreich eigenhändige Quittungen des Königs über… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Acquit — (frz., spr. ackí), Quittung, Empfangsschein; pour a. oder par a. (pr. a.), Quittungsformel auf Rechnungen, Wechseln etc. Beim Billard ist A. (A. geben) das Aussetzen des Balles. – Acquit à caution (spr. ackitakohßĭóng), Begleitschein von… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • acquit — [v1] announce removal of blame absolve, blink at*, clear, deliver, discharge, disculpate, exculpate, excuse, exonerate, free, let go, let off, let off the hook*, liberate, release, relieve, vindicate, whitewash*, wink at*, wipe off*; concepts… …   New thesaurus

  • acquit — ► VERB (acquitted, acquitting) 1) formally declare that (someone) is not guilty of a criminal charge. 2) (acquit oneself) behave or perform in a specified way. DERIVATIVES acquittal noun. ORIGIN Latin acquitare pay a debt …   English terms dictionary

  • Acquit — Ac*quit , p. p. Acquitted; set free; rid of. [Archaic] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Acquit — (franz., spr. ackí), Quittung, Empfangschein; pour a., soviel wie den Empfang bescheinigt, empfangen. – Beim Billard bedeutet A. das Aussetzen des Balles (s. Billard) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Acquit — Acquit, quittirt …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”