eject


eject
eject /i-'jekt/ vt: dispossess

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

eject
I (evict) verb cast out, deicere, dislodge, displace, dispossess, divest, expel, get rid of, oust, put out, put out of possession, remove, remove from premises, rid, summarily dispossess, throw out, thrust out, turn out, turn out of possession II (expel) verb cast forth, cast out, detrude, discard, discharge, disgorge, dismiss, eicere, eliminate, eruct, eructate, exclude, expellere, extrudere, force out, jettison, oust, push away, push out, remove, throw out, thrust out III index cast (throw), censor, deport (banish), depose (remove), discharge (dismiss), dislocate, dislodge, dismiss (discharge), dispel, displace (remove), eliminate (exclude), emanate, emit, eradicate, evict, exclude, expatriate, expel, jettison, launch (project), luxate, oust, outpour, project (impel forward), reject, remove (dismiss from office), send, supplant

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


eject
v. To remove from premises; to push out or cast off.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • eject — vb Eject, expel, oust, evict, dismiss mean to force or thrust something or someone out. Eject, although it is the comprehensive term of this group and is often interchangeable with any of the others, carries the strongest implication of throwing… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Eject — E*ject , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ejected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ejecting}.] [L. ejectus, p. p. of ejicere; e out + jacere to throw. See {Jet} a shooting forth.] 1. To expel; to dismiss; to cast forth; to thrust or drive out; to discharge; as, to eject a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • eject — [ē jekt′, ijekt] vt. [< L ejectus, pp. of ejicere, to throw out < e , out (see EX 1) + jacere, to throw (see JET1)] 1. to throw out; cast out; expel; emit; discharge [the chimney ejects smoke] 2. to drive out; evict [to eject a heckler] …   English World dictionary

  • Eject — E ject, n. [See {Eject}, v. t.] (Philos.) An object that is a conscious or living object, and hence not a direct object, but an inferred object or act of a subject, not myself; a term invented by W. K. Clifford. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • eject — eject·ment; eject; …   English syllables

  • eject — i jekt vt to force out or expel from within <blood ejected from the heart (S. F. Mason)> ejec·tion jek shən n …   Medical dictionary

  • eject — mid 15c., from L. eiectus thrown out, pp. of eicere throw out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + icere, comb. form of iacere to throw (see JET (Cf. jet) (v.)). Related: Ejected; ejecting …   Etymology dictionary

  • eject — (izg. idžèkt) m DEFINICIJA tehn. tipka za izbacivanje medija na audio i video uređajima (ili u računalnim programima) ETIMOLOGIJA engl. ← lat., v. ejektirati …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • eject — [v] throw or be thrown out banish, bounce*, bump, cast out, debar, disbar, discharge, disgorge, dislodge, dismiss, displace, dispossess, ditch, do away with*, drive off, dump*, eighty six*, ejaculate, eliminate, emit, eradicate, eruct, erupt,… …   New thesaurus

  • eject — ► VERB 1) force or throw out violently or suddenly. 2) (of a pilot) escape from an aircraft by means of an ejection seat. 3) compel (someone) to leave a place. DERIVATIVES ejection noun ejector noun. ORIGIN Latin eicere throw out , from jacere …   English terms dictionary


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