effect


effect
ef·fect 1 n
1: something that is produced by an agent or cause
the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effect s, against unreasonable searches and seizuresU.S. Constitution amend. IV
3: the quality or state of being operative
when the new law goes into effect
effect 2 vt
1: to cause to come into being
2: to bring about often by surmounting obstacles
effect a settlement of the dispute
3: to put into operation
the duty of the legislature to effect the will of the citizens

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

effect
I noun accomplishment, achievement, aftermath, consecutio, consequence, development, effectuation, effectus, end product, end result, eventuation, eventus, final result, fruit, fruition, impact, issue, outcome, outgrowth, payoff, product, reaction, repercussion, response, result, resultant, resultant action, sequel, termination, upshot associated concepts: cause and effect, chilling effect, effective procuring cause, force and effect, natural effect, personal effects foreign phrases:
- Effectus sequitur causam. — The effect follows the cause
- Verba accipienda sunt cum effectu, ut sortiantur effectum. — Words are to be received with effect, so that they may be productive of effect
- Cessante causa, cessat effectus. — The cause ceasing, the effect must cease
- Cum quod ago non valet ut ago, vaieat quantum valere potest. — When that which I do is of no effect as I do it, it shall be as effective as it can (otherwise) be made
- Nova constitutio futuris formam imponere debet non praeteritis. — A new law ought to affect the future, not what is past
- Non efficit affectus nisi sequatur effectus. — The intention amounts to nothing unless some effect follows
- Verba accipienda ut sortiantur effectum. — Words should be taken so that they may have some effect
- Cuicunque aliquis quid concedit concedere videtur et id, sine quo res ipsa esse non potuit. — Whoever grants anything to another is supposed to grant that also without which the grant itself would be of no effect
- Juris affectus in executione consistit. — The effectiveness of a law lies in its execution
- Quando quod ago non valet ut ago, vaieat quantum valere potest — When that which I do does not have effect as I do it, let it have as much effect as it can
- Cessante ratione legis, cessat et ipsa lex. — Where the reason for a law ceases, the law itself also ceases
- Officit conatus si effectus sequatur. — The attempt becomes of consequence, if the effect follows
II index accomplish, administer (conduct), amount (result), article (commodity), attain, avail (bring about), carry (succeed), cast (register), cause, chattel, chilling effect, commit (perpetrate), compose, conclusion (outcome), conduce, consequence (conclusion), consequence (significance), constitute (establish), consummate, contrive, create, culminate, development (outgrowth), discharge (perform), dispatch (dispose of), effectuate, elicit, enforce, engender, evoke, execute (accomplish), fulfill, generate, holding (property owned), implement, impose (subject), impression, induce, influence, inspire, item, legislate, lobby, magnitude, make, occasion, operate, originate, outcome, outgrowth, perform (execute), perpetrate, possession (property), proceeds, procure, produce (manufacture), product, provoke, reaction (response), realize (make real), redound, result, semblance, signification, toll (effect), value, weight (importance)

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


effect
As a verb, to do; to produce; to make; to bring to pass; to execute; enforce; accomplish. As a noun, that which is produced by an agent or cause; result; outcome; consequence. The result that an instrument between parties will produce in their relative rights, or which a statute will produce upon the existing law, as discovered from the language used, the forms employed, or other materials for construing it. The operation of a law, of an agreement, or an act. The phrases take effect, be in force, and go into operation, are used interchangeably.
In the plural, a person's effects are the real and personal property of someone who has died or who makes a will.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


effect
As a verb, to do; to produce; to make; to bring to pass; to execute; enforce; accomplish. As a noun, that which is produced by an agent or cause; result; outcome; consequence. The result that an instrument between parties will produce in their relative rights, or which a statute will produce upon the existing law, as discovered from the language used, the forms employed, or other materials for construing it. The operation of a law, of an agreement, or an act. The phrases take effect, be in force, and go into operation, are used interchangeably.
 
In the plural, a person's effects are the real and personal property of someone who has died or who makes a will.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Effect — Ef*fect , n. [L. effectus, fr. efficere, effectum, to effect; ex + facere to make: cf. F. effet, formerly also spelled effect. See {Fact}.] 1. Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • effect — n 1 Effect, result, consequence, upshot, aftereffect, aftermath, sequel, issue, outcome, event are comparable in signifying something, usually a condition, situation, or occurrence, ascribable to a cause or combination of causes. Effect is the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • effect — [e fekt′, ifekt′; ] often [ ēfekt′, əfekt′] n. [ME < OFr (& L) < L effectus, orig., pp. of efficere, to bring to pass, accomplish < ex , out + facere, DO1] 1. anything brought about by a cause or agent; result 2. the power or ability to… …   English World dictionary

  • effect — que l art fait, Effectio artis. Effect et pouvoir, Effectus. Homme de peu d effect, Parum efficax homo. Tout l effect d amitié git en mesme vouloir, Vis amicitiae est in animorum consensione. Laquelle signification approcha si trespres de l… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • effect — ► NOUN 1) a change which is a result or consequence of an action or other cause. 2) the state of being or becoming operative. 3) the extent to which something succeeds or is operative: wind power can be used to great effect. 4) (effects) personal …   English terms dictionary

  • Effect — Effect, Wirkung, Erfolg, wird besonders von einer erhöhten, einer überraschenden Wirkung gebraucht. In der Kunst darf der Künstler wohl den Effect anbringen, jedoch ohne die Harmonie der einzelnen Theile unter einander zu stören; er darf nicht… …   Damen Conversations Lexikon

  • Effect — Effect, from Latin effectus performance, accomplishment can be used in various meanings: * Any result of another action or circumstance (see pragma , phenomenon, list of effects); * Cause and effect are the relata of causality; * In movies and… …   Wikipedia

  • effect — [n1] result aftereffect, aftermath, backlash, backwash, can of worms*, causatum, chain reaction*, conclusion, consequence, corollary, denouement, development, end, end product, event, eventuality, fallout, flak*, follow through, follow up, fruit …   New thesaurus

  • Effect — Ef*fect , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Effected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Effecting}.] 1. To produce, as a cause or agent; to cause to be. [1913 Webster] So great a body such exploits to effect. Daniel. [1913 Webster] 2. To bring to pass; to execute; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • effect — (n.) late 14c., a result, from O.Fr. efet (13c., Mod.Fr. effet) result, execution, completion, ending, from L. effectus accomplishment, performance, from pp. stem of efficere work out, accomplish, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + facere to do… …   Etymology dictionary


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