condemn
con·demn /kən-'dem/ vt
1: to impose a penalty on; esp: to sentence to death
2: to adjudge unfit for use or consumption
3: to declare convertible to public use under the right of eminent domain: take
con·dem·nable /kən-'dem-nə-bəl, -'de-mə-/ adj
con·dem·na·tion /ˌkän-ˌdem-'nā-shən/ n
con·demn·er or con·dem·nor /kən-'de-mər, -'dem-ˌnȯr/ n

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. . 1996.

condemn
I (ban) verb abhor, abnegate, abrogate, banish, bar, blackball, block, boycott, call a halt, cancel, cast aside, cast out, censor, check, counter, debar, deny, deprive, disallow, disapprove, discommode, discountenance, disfavor, disown, disqualify, embargo, enjoin, exclude, excommunicate, expel, forbid, forestall, frustrate, halt, hamper, impede, interdict, interrupt, keep in bounds, keep out, keep within bounds, lay an embargo on, limit, make impossible, object, obstruct, oppose, ostracize, outlaw, preclude, prevent, prohibit, proscribe, put a stop to, put an embargo on, put an end to, put one's veto to, put under an injunction, put under an interdiction, put under prohibition, quash, quell, refuse, reject, repress, reprobate, restrain, restrict, restrict access, retard, seclude, shut out, stop, suppress, thwart, vetare, withhold II (blame) verb accuse, anathematize, animadvert, asperse, assail with censure, attack, berate, bring into discredit, call to account, cast blame upon, castigate, charge, chide, condemnare, criticize, culpare, declaim against, decry, denigrate, denounce, deprecate, derogate, disapprove, discountenance, disdain, disparage, dispraise, execrate, find guilty, fulminate against, impeach, implicate, impugn, incriminate, indict, inveigh against, pass censure on, publicly accuse, rebuke, reprehend, reproach, reprove, repudiate, revile, take to task, upbraid, vilify, vituperare, vituperate III (punish) verb adjudge, administer correction, bring to account, carry out a sentence, convict, damnare, deal retributive justice, discipline, doom, exact a penalty, exact retribution, execute a sentence, execute justice, impose a penalty, impose penalty, inflict penalty, inflict punishment, pass sentence on, penalize, prescribe punishment, pronounce judgment, pronounce sentence, punire, reprimand, reprove, sentence, subject to penalty, take disciplinary action IV (seize) verb accroach, acquire, appropriate, arrogate, assume, assume ownership, attach, compulsorily acquire, confiscate, declare to be forfeited, deprive of corporal possession, deprive of ownership, disentitle, dispossess, disseise, distrain, divest of property, expropriate, foreclose, impound, impropriate, municipalize, nationalize, publicare, sequestrate, take for public use, take over, take possession, usurp associated concepts: eminent domain V index blame, cavil, censure, charge (accuse), complain (criticize), confiscate, convict, criticize (find fault with), decry, defame, denigrate, discommend, disparage, execute (sentence to death), fault, impeach, incriminate, judge, libel, proscribe (denounce), punish, reprehend, reprimand, reproach, sentence

Burton's Legal Thesaurus. . 2006


condemn
v.
(1) To find someone guilty of a crime; to sentence someone to death.
(2) To disapprove of publicly.
(3) To officially declare a building unfit for use.
(4) To use eminent domain to take private property for public use.
n.
condemnation

The Essential Law Dictionary. — Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks, Inc. . 2008.


condemn
1) When a public agency determines that a building is unsafe or unfit for habitation and must be torn down or rebuilt to meet building and health code requirements.
2) When a governmental agency takes private property for public use under the right of eminent domain, but constitutionally the property owner must receive just compensation. If an agreement cannot be reached then the owner is entitled to a court determination of value in a condemnation action (lawsuit), but the public body can take the property immediately upon deposit of the estimated value.
3) To sentence a convicted defendant to death.
4) Send to prison.
Category: Business, LLCs & Corporations → Business Name, Location & Licenses
Category: Criminal Law
Category: Real Estate & Rental Property → Homeowners
Category: Small Claims Court & Lawsuits

Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary. . 2009.


condemn
v.
1 To expropriate private property, usually land, for public use.
2 To adjudge someone guilty of a crime or to impose sentence, especially a severe penalty such as death or life imprisonment.
3 To adjudge something, often a building, to be illegal, unfit for public use, or a hazard to the public and order it to be destroyed.

Webster's New World Law Dictionary. . 2000.


condemn
To adjudge or find guilty of a crime and sentence. To declare a building or ship unsafe for use or occupancy. To decide that a navigable vessel is a prize or is unfit for service. To take privately owned land for public use in exchange for just compensation by virtue of the power of eminent domain.

Dictionary from West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.


condemn
To adjudge or find guilty of a crime and sentence. To declare a building or ship unsafe for use or occupancy. To decide that a navigable vessel is a prize or is unfit for service. To take privately owned land for public use in exchange for just compensation by virtue of the power of eminent domain.

Short Dictionary of (mostly American) Legal Terms and Abbreviations.

condemn
v.
   1) for a public agency to determine that a building is unsafe or unfit for habitation and must be torn down or rebuilt to meet building and health code requirements.
   2) for a governmental agency to take private property for public use under the right of eminent domain, but constitutionally the property owner must receive just compensation. If an agreement cannot be reached then the owner is entitled to a court determination of value in a condemnation action (lawsuit), but the public body can take the property immediately upon deposit of the estimated value.
   3) to sentence a convicted defendant to death.
   4) send to prison.

Law dictionary. . 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Condemn — Con*demn , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Condemned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Condemning} (? or ?).] [L. condemnare; con + damnare to condemn: cf. F. condamner. See {Damn}.] 1. To pronounce to be wrong; to disapprove of; to censure. [1913 Webster] Condemn the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • condemn — [kən dem′] vt. [ME condempnen < OFr condemner < L condemnare < com , intens. + damnare, to harm, condemn: see DAMN] 1. to pass an adverse judgment on; disapprove of strongly; censure 2. a) to declare to be guilty of wrongdoing; convict… …   English World dictionary

  • condemn — (v.) early 14c., condempner to blame, censure, from O.Fr. condamner to condemn (11c.), from L. condemnare to sentence, doom, blame, disapprove, from com , intensive prefix (see COM (Cf. com )), + damnare to harm, damage (see DAMN (Cf. damn)).… …   Etymology dictionary

  • condemn — ► VERB 1) express complete disapproval of. 2) (usu. condemn to) sentence to a punishment, especially death. 3) force (someone) to endure something unpleasant. 4) officially declare to be unfit for use. 5) prove the guilt of. DERIVATIVES …   English terms dictionary

  • condemn — 1 denounce, censure, blame, reprobate, reprehend, *criticize Analogous words: *judge, adjudge: *decry, belittle, depreciate, disparage: *disapprove, deprecate Contrasted words: *commend, applaud, compliment …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • condemn — has a silent final n, but this is pronounced in its derivatives condemnable, condemnation, and condemnatory …   Modern English usage

  • condemn — [v] blame, convict adjudge, belittle, blow whistle on*, call down*, castigate, censure, chide, come down on*, criticize, damn, decry, denounce, denunciate, deprecate, depreciate, disapprove, disparage, doom, find fault with, find guilty, frame,… …   New thesaurus

  • condemn — v. 1) to condemn bitterly, harshly, strongly; unfairly, unjustly 2) (D; tr.) to condemn as (they were condemned as traitors) 3) (D; tr.) to condemn for (he was condemned for stealing a horse) 4) (D; tr.) to condemn to (to condemn smb. to death;… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • condemn — con|demn [kənˈdem] v [T] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(disapprove)¦ 2¦(punish)¦ 3¦(force to do something)¦ 4¦(not safe)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: condemner, from Latin condemnare, from com ( COM ) + damnare ( DAMN4)] 1.) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • condemn — verb (T) 1 DISAPPROVE to say very strongly that you do not approve of something or someone, especially because you think it is morally wrong: Politicians were quick to condemn the bombing. | condemn sth/sb as: The law has been condemned as an… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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